Posted in book review

#10 After the fire

fire

It’s that time again… the Carnegie shortlist is out! This year I’m feeling quite smug as I’ve already inadvertently read one; the wonderful The hate u give by Angi Thomas (which I reviewed here). So technically second on my list is After the fire by Will Hill…

The book opens with a horrific scene; fire, guns and fear. Seventeen year old Moonbeam has been ‘liberated’ with a handful of her Brothers and Sisters from a cult- the Lord’s Legion- lead by the infamous Father John. Under the care of Dr Hernandez and Agent Carlyle, she begins to recount life behind the fence. But what really happened that day? Who is to blame?

Keep on reading!

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Posted in book review

#9 The travelling cat chronicles

cat

I am always keen to try new genres and styles, so when I spotted a book in translation about a travelling cat, I was intrigued. The travelling cat chronicles is a book by Hiro Arikawa, translated by Philip Gabriel. I have read translated books in the past and found them to be fascinating. Not only do they give you insight into new and exciting cultures, but they carry the voice of both the author and the translator. It’s clearly not as straight forward as putting it in Google translate…

Nana the cat is on a road trip across Japan with Satori, the owner he adores, and his trusty silver van.  Along the way Nana meets Satori’s old friends, reminiscing with stories of times past, both good and bad. But what is the purpose of the trip? And what does it mean for Satori and Nana?

Keep on reading!

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#7 The woman in the window

IMG_20180314_220332859.jpgI love a good recommendation, so when a colleague insisted I read A J Finn’s debut thriller, The woman in the windowI was excited to get started. That and the fact that Gillian Flynn was waxing lyrical on the front cover (seriously, stop doing reviews and write another book. Please). It took me a little while to get hold of it, but it was worth the wait.

Dr Anna Fox lives in her beautiful home in New York. And yet, she doesn’t have an enviable life. For the last ten months, Anna has been unable to leave her house. She spends her days gazing through her window at her neighbours, trawling the internet and drinking the odd bottle of wine… or two. One day, though the lens of her Nikon camera, she watches a horrific event at the Russells’ house. Her whole life unraveling, Anna is desperate to be believed. But what really happened that night?

Keep on reading!

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#5 Three things about Elsie

elsie

I read and loved Joanna Cannon’s The trouble with goats and sheep for my book group a couple of years ago. It was unexpectedly brilliant. For me, Three things about Elsie is even better.

84 year old Florence is lying on the floor of her room in the Cherry Tree Home for the Elderly, waiting to be rescued. Contemplating the recent strange goings on at the home- particularly the arrival of a man that died sixty years ago- she recounts her life. You see, everyone thinks that Florence is losing her mind; a couple of decisions away from the dreaded high dependency home, Greenbank. With the help of Jack and best friend Elsie, can she solve the mystery and remember what happened all those years ago?

Keep on reading!

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#4 The chalk man

chalk

I know you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but this one really drew me in. It gives very little away, other than it’s clearly going to be disturbing, and I love it. The chalk man is C. J. Tudor’s gritty debut thriller and I was really excited to finally get my hands on a copy.

It’s 1986. Twelve year old Eddie and his group of friends live the life, biking and adventuring. When Fat Gav gets a mysterious bucket of chalk for his birthday, the friends create their very own secret code; little chalk stick men. One day the chalk men lead them to a mutilated body. In 2016 Eddie receives a mysterious letter in the post. It contains a single figure; a chalk man…

Is it a prank? Or is history repeating itself? What really happened all those years ago?

Keep on reading!

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#3 The hate u give (THUG)

hate

I read this book on recommendation from a very good friend. I love a good YA book, particularly one with an accolade from John Green on the cover. I was excited to give it a go.

The hate u give (THUG) is the story of sixteen year old Starr, a black girl living in two distinctly different worlds. With her dysfunctional family in the impoverished Garden Heights neighbourhood and with her white boyfriend and friends at Williamson Prep. When Starr becomes the only witness to a heinous crime, she has to make a decision. Is it time to speak up?

Keep on reading!

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Oops, I missed one: #57 Hold back the stars

stars

I don’t normally seek out love stories, but this one really caught my eye. Katie Khan’s debut novel- Hold back the stars– just had the most intriguing synopsis. I used my buying ‘powers’ to ensure it made it into our libraries.

Set in a ‘utopian’ future, Carys and Max meet on one of their rotations- a system of movement every 3 years designed to ensure that under 35’s don’t get ‘attached’. Their attraction is instant, powerful, dangerous. Impossible. Now Carys and Max are in space and time is running out…

Carys and Max have ninety minutes of air left.

None of this is supposed to happen.

Keep on reading!